Category: Templum


In the 1970s, Erich von Däniken’s bestselling book Chariots of the Gods fired up a craze of speculation that aliens had visited our ancestors thousands of years ago, spurring the dawn of human civilization. Von Däniken cited such evidence as the ancient Nazca Lines in Peru, suggesting they were designed to be seen from the air or space, as well as pictographs of humanoid figures that appeared to be wearing spacesuits.

A notebook computer in ancient Rome?Now an article in the UK’s Sunday Express suggests that time travelers rather than aliens may have visited our ancestors, bringing with them modern technology like helicopters, planes and notebook computers. (See one of several curious photos from the Express article on the right.)

Does all of this speculation make Templum, my fictional account of time travel to ancient Rome, any more feasible? 🙂 Could a modern-day woman be transported to the first century and have to face the upcoming eruption of Vesuvius? For me, the premise was intriguing enough to suspend my disbelief and explore the idea. You can read the first couple of chapters of my take on it on this page. (Scroll down the page to view the reader.)

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Awed in Agrigento

Hubby and I are just back from a trip to Sicily, highlighted by four nights in a lovely B&B with a view of the Valley of the Temples at Agrigento. If you’re not familiar with this site, well, you’re not alone. I suspect it’s one of most under-appreciated places in the world — a true candidate for one of the Seven Wonders. The Valley boasts a complex of enormous temples built in the fifth century BCE when the area was a Greek colony. (The Parthenon in Athens was built around the same time.) It’s the largest archaeological site in the world.

At the Valley's best-preserved temple, dedicated -- I'm guessing -- to Athena

At the Valley’s best-preserved temple, dedicated — I’m guessing — to Athena

We entered the archaeological park (10 euros to get in) from the lower end. The first temple we encountered, traditionally ascribed to Castor and Pollux, has only four columns and a corner standing. But as I walked up to the towering reconstructed remains, the beauty of the architecture and the immensity of its purpose brought tears to my eyes. It’s unclear now which deities were worshiped in which temples in the Valley, but votive offerings to Demeter and Persephone show they were important in this zone, and despite extensive robbing out of the structures for Dark-Ages building projects, the sacred atmosphere lingers.

The largest of the temples, in a very poor state, is firmly connected to Zeus. Next up the hill comes Hera’s sanctuary, followed by the best preserved temple, called Concordia (a Roman name, not Greek). Oddly, I haven’t read any theories about which deity it celebrates, but knowing that Roman cities typically had their main sanctuary dedicated to Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, my guess is “Concordia,” juxtaposed by temples to Zeus and Hera, was dedicated to Athena. 😉

If, like me, you’re a lover of sacred places, Agrigento is a pilgimmage I can’t recommend strongly enough. Also, if you’re interested in Hellenistic religion (and romance!), please check out my time-travel adventure Templum.

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Today is the anniversary of the eruption of Vesuvius that buried Pompeii in 79 CE. It’s also my eldest nephew’s birthday, so doubly an important date for me. On this day, one of the most evocative places on earth was frozen in time for us to explore two millennia later — plus I first got to stick out my tongue at a newborn and see him mimic me (as I’d hoped). He has been a quick study ab ovo. 🙂

Vesuvius, from House of the Centenary, PompeiiVesuvius’s most famous eruption was a horrendous tragedy when it happened, but the trove of information it left us about daily life in a Roman town is invaluable — so much more fascinating than written history, which is mostly just about war. For example, the fresco here from a household shrine in ancient Pompeii apparently shows the volcano as it looked before the top blew. This is the only known depiction during the 500 dormant years that lulled the residents of the region into a false sense of safety. Some of those living on the slopes must have seen evidence of charring, steam vents and bubbling mud, but the last eruption had long passed from living memory.

The guy dressed in grapes next to the volcano is Bacchus (aka Dionysus), god of wine, present because the volcanic soil was (and is) excellent for vineyards.

If you’re curious about life in first-century Italy, please check out a fictional exploration in my time-travel romance, Templum. My contemporary mystery/romance The Five-Day-Dig also taps into the unparalleled mystique of this setting.

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Being pretty much obsessed with ancient Rome and especially Pompeii, of course I saw the new movie about the star-crossed city on its opening weekend. The action/adventure film follows Milo (Kit Harington), a gladiator enslaved in Pompeii, as he befriends his fiercest competitor in the arena (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje), catches the eye of a rich but sympathetic beauty (Emily Browning), and then finds himself fighting for his life and theirs during the eruption that we all know buried the town in the year 79.

Kit Harington as Milo--the paintings on the arena walls are a nice, historically accurate detail.

Kit Harington as Milo–the paintings on the arena walls are a nice, historically accurate detail.

The director (Paul WS Anderson) is best known for sci-fi horror pics — not usually my thing — so I wasn’t sure the story would appeal to me, but I enjoyed this movie. All three protagonists have integrity and compassion, so you want to see them overcome both the bad guys and the wrath of nature. As a woman and a romance novelist, I would have preferred more emphasis on the realm of Venus than that of Mars, but the romance we get is satisfyingly, if quickly, developed, and so is the “buddy” relationship between the two main male characters.

Having visited the ruins of the real Pompeii, I also loved seeing the amazing town alive again on the big screen. The filmmakers made a good effort to depict the streets, amphitheater and villa interiors in a realistic way. While reading or watching fiction, I’m happy to suspend disbelief over details, but nitpickers will probably find most fault with the way the eruption plays out.

Compared to my new time-travel novel Templum, set in the same time and place, Pompeii has much more violence and much less sex. 🙂 Since Templum is primarily a romance, it follows that the love story in my book is more deeply explored. If you watched the Showtime cable TV series “Spartacus,” well, Pompeii has both less gore and less sex, but more likable characters and more romance. All in all, worth seeing — and best seen in the theater to do justice to the scenery and action sequences.

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Templum, my new time travel, is up on Kindle and Nook! (Print edition coming soon.) Check it out:

Cover for TemplumAfter losing her job, her boyfriend and her best friend, Brit Colladay thinks she’s hit rock bottom. Then while touring Roman ruins, she’s accidentally transported to the first century. Living as a slave near Pompeii, she fakes a gift of prophecy, but when she predicts Vesuvius will erupt, her owner doesn’t believe her.

Nicomachus, a Roman priest renowned for the “miracles” he engineers, knows a fraud when he sees one, but Brit’s brains and beauty intrigue him, and he’d rather join forces than expose her. In exchange for sharing her tricks, she wants help escaping the upcoming eruption, but helping a slave run away could get him executed.

As time runs out, they try to forge a plan. Is the answer fleeing, traveling through time, or even changing history? And can they stay together, or will survival mean living apart?

Links to Amazon and Barnes and Noble below the cover pic on left. (How do you like the cover? 🙂 )

To find on Amazon, go here.
For the Nookbook, click here.
For the UK Amazon page, use this link;
Amazon Australia, click here;
Amazon Canada, here.

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